Path Home Shows 2009 Show Archive May 2009 Show 0920 Aerospace in the Classroom

Aerospace in the Classroom

If the first step in maintaining a strong aviation industry in Oklahoma is education, then a group of teachers are making some great strides in the classroom.
Aerospace in the Classroom

Boarding a plane

Show Dates

Show 0920: Aerospace in the Classroom

Air date: May 17, 2009

 

Transcript

Rob:  Well if education is the first step in maintaining a strong aviation industry in Oklahoma, then a group of teachers are making some great strides.  Our Lisa Riley visited one such classroom and joins us now.

Lisa:  Well Rob, ask any student what they want to be when they grow up and their response may typically be a teacher, scientist, or astronaut.  I met up with an eighth grade instructor who is making her students mere dreams become reality.

Lisa:  Kelly Wardlaw knows how to make an impact on her class.  The eighth grade science teacher at Stillwater Junior High says the lessons she teaches could someday have an impact on the world.

Kelly Wardlaw:  I see, in my students, the interest that they have when we start talking about airplanes, when we talk about the planets, when we talk about space.  Their questions are never ending.  You know, they have questions.  Why?  Why?  Why?  Why?  What if?  What if?  What if?  And they’re very interested in that subject.  So anything that I can do, to get them interested about science, and asking questions about science, is going to help me get them excited and get them learning.

Lisa:  Wardlaw goes beyond the call of duty to ensure her students learn, but more importantly, making sure they have fun.

Wardlaw:  It’s something that kids are automatically drawn to, they’re automatically interested in.

Lisa:  Wardlaw was one of 100 Oklahoma teachers able to attend last summer’s Aerospace Education Summit thanks to an aerospace education scholarship.  Learning about an industry that now employs one in ten Oklahomans.  Recipients of the scholarship are able to bring in industry workers to visit and talk with students throughout the year; CareerTech’s aerospace program supervisor, H L Baird.

H L Baird:  We’re making a connection between industry and the teachers.  And the teachers are going to be our advocates, or our ambassadors into the students.  If we can get them to use aerospace applications in their classrooms, and get students excited about it, we believe that, that’s going to foster them to look more into aerospace.

Wardlaw:  When I can bring in somebody who, you know, works in aerospace and says, you know, hey, this is how I use what you all are studying.  These are some examples of why friction is important and how I use it every day in my job.  It gets the students interested.  And then they’re more interested in learning about that subject, and gives them ideas on where they’re going in the future too.

Lisa:  Preparing a skilled and ready aerospace workforce for tomorrow by preparing today’s teachers.

Lisa:  Another 100 teachers will be awarded the aerospace education scholarship this year.  To learn more about the summit or register to attend, go to www.okaero.com and click on summit.

Lisa:  Another 100 teachers will be awarded the aerospace education scholarship this year.  To learn more about the summit or register to attend, go to www. OkAero.com and click on summit.

Rob:  Nice story Lisa, thank you so much.  And if you did miss that web address, we do have a link on our website at OkHorizon.com.