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Wind Power

State leaders believe Oklahoma can lead the way in both research and the production of wind generating equipment which is why an Oklahoma delegation traveled across the Atlantic to the largest wind expo in Europe.
Wind Power

Wind turbine

For more information visit these links:

Oklahoma Department of Commerce
European Wind Energy Association
Economics of Wind Energy

Show Dates

Show 0915: Wind Power

Air date: April 12, 2009

 

Transcript

Rob:  Well state officials are working hard to position Oklahoma as the center of wind power in this country, and not just wind generation.  State leaders believe Oklahoma can lead the way in both research and the production of wind generating equipment, which is why, an Oklahoma delegation traveled across the Atlantic to the largest wind expo in Europe.

Rob:  From huge blades spinning off the Danish coast, to turbines high in the French Alps, wind power is sweeping through Europe.  Arthous Zervous is president of Europe’s Wind Energy Association.

Arthous Zervous:  Already we're producing 4.3% of the electricity of the European Union is produced by wind.  And what we expect is that by 2020 we'll have somewhere between 14 and 18% of the electricity produced by wind.

Rob:  European growth that’s spreading across the Atlantic to this country.

Sandy Pratt:  Within the last two years, in our business attraction efforts, there have many companies from Europe and Asia that are interested in establishing a manufacturing facility or a maintenance repair and operation facility in the U S, and many of those have looked at Oklahoma.

Rob:  The Department of Commerce’s Sandy Pratt was part of an Oklahoma team to travel to Marseille, France, to Europe’s largest wind energy show, all in an effort to partner with this growing business sector.

Arthous Zervous:  The main drivers behind wind energy have not changed, they will not go away: electricity costability, emission reductions, air quality, energy security and economic development.  Wind energy is not a luxury, but a necessity, even in the changing economic climate.

Rob:  An economic climate that’s chilled investment capital forcing many wind companies to slow expansion.  Still those in the industry believe the global outlook for wind energy remains buoyant.

Nobuo Tanaka:  Currently the financial crisis, financial sector is totally pessimistic.  But in general, energy sector is optimistic, because we need more and more energy demand coming back, and especially this renewable energy, including wind industry, is very optimistic.

Rob:  An optimism Oklahoma’s Sandy Pratt says is being fueled by investment from the federal stimulus package into our country’s alternative energy sector.

Sandy Pratt:  The U S is already a market for them.  They know that.  They are moving in that direction.  This just enhances that opportunity for them, providing additional incentives, tax advantages and things to make it more profitable for them to do business in the U S.

Rob:  And Pratt say thanks to contacts made during the European wind show, they’ve identified close to a dozen projects that could bring new jobs into the state.